Lent Week 3

Psalm 63:1-8
O God, you are my God, I seek you, my soul thirsts for you; my flesh faints for you, as in a dry and weary land where there is no water. So I have looked upon you in the sanctuary, beholding your power and glory. Because your steadfast love is better than life, my lips will praise you. So I will bless you as long as I live; I will lift up my hands and call on your name. My soul is satisfied as with a rich feast, and my mouth praises you with joyful lips when I think of you on my bed, and meditate on you in the watches of the night; for you have been my help, and in the shadow of your wings I sing for joy. My soul clings to you; your right hand upholds me.

 

 

It’s interesting seeing lectionary texts this week that talk about refreshment, food, satisfaction, and being filled, considering that it is the third week of Lent and we should be in the middle of our disciplines, practices, fasting, and abstaining (see also Isaiah 55.)  However these passages come from a Lenten space, a place of lack and desire. The Psalmist’s soul thirsts and his flesh faints for God and the rich, satisfying provision of God’s steadfast love. The Psalmist is reaching out from a place of scarcity to be filled with nourishment and praise.

Sometimes we go into Lent with ambitious intentions of taking on or giving up something, but we’re not always sure what our end goal will be. How are we hoping to grow? Where do we need healing? While we are in our Lenten season, let us learn from the Psalmist to identify where in our lives we find ourselves thirsting and fainting. Where are we aching, parched, and empty? If we take a moment to assess ourselves spiritually, emotionally, physically, relationally, and mentally we can see where in our lives we can invite God to satisfy those places that lack the care we need.

Lent Week 2

Philippians 3:17-4:1
Brothers and sisters, join in imitating me, and observe those who live according to the example you have in us. For many live as enemies of the cross of Christ; I have often told you of them, and now I tell you even with tears. Their end is destruction; their god is the belly; and their glory is in their shame; their minds are set on earthly things. But our citizenship is in heaven, and it is from there that we are expecting a Savior, the Lord Jesus Christ. He will transform the body of our humiliation that it may be conformed to the body of his glory, by the power that also enables him to make all things subject to himself. Therefore, my brothers and sisters, whom I love and long for, my joy and crown, stand firm in the Lord in this way, my beloved.

 

 

In the second week of lent as I consider where I am in my faith and how my soul is on a healing journey, I read this scripture and something important struck me: there is no place for humiliation in God’s glory. He will transform the body of our humiliation that it may be conformed to the body of his glory, by the power that also enables him to make all things subject to himself. 

I don’t think we can be followers of Christ without a need and desire to uphold and honor human dignity. When we reduce people down to their housing and employment status, their immigration status, their skin color, how much weight they carry, their physical and mental abilities,  their gender or sexuality, and their religion, we have already failed to live up to the Gospel of Jesus Christ. God does not love me more than you. It would be sinful of me to think so. It would put me in opposition to everything that Jesus taught.

All people deserve to be treated as valuable and precious. Because there is no room for humiliation, devaluation, and discrimination in the Kingdom of God. That means I have to work on my heart and what I hold against others. That’s hard to admit, but I have to wake up and remind myself everyday that God loves all the people I don’t like every bit as much as God loves me.

When we forget human dignity, we are turning away from God’s glory. Then we get events like the Christchurch, New Zealand shooting. For many live as enemies of the cross of Christ; I have often told you of them, and now I tell you even with tears. Their end is destruction; their god is the belly; and their glory is in their shame; their minds are set on earthly things. It does not glorify God to hurt or kill or discriminate against or dislike or be suspicious of or give side-eye to Muslims, Sikhs, Buddhists, or people of any other faith. God loves them and cherishes them; we should hold them and all people in sacred regard for life. We should celebrate our diversity and rejoice in who God has made us to be.

God’s glory leaves no room for humiliation. Human dignity is a completely necessary tenant of our faith.

Lent Week 1

Deuteronomy 26:1-11
When you have come into the land that the LORD your God is giving you as an inheritance to possess, and you possess it, and settle in it, you shall take some of the first of all the fruit of the ground, which you harvest from the land that the LORD your God is giving you, and you shall put it in a basket and go to the place that the LORD your God will choose as a dwelling for his name. You shall go to the priest who is in office at that time, and say to him, “Today I declare to the LORD your God that I have come into the land that the LORD swore to our ancestors to give us.” When the priest takes the basket from your hand and sets it down before the altar of the LORD your God, you shall make this response before the LORD your God: “A wandering Aramean was my ancestor; he went down into Egypt and lived there as an alien, few in number, and there he became a great nation, mighty and populous. When the Egyptians treated us harshly and afflicted us, by imposing hard labor on us, we cried to the LORD, the God of our ancestors; the LORD heard our voice and saw our affliction, our toil, and our oppression. The LORD brought us out of Egypt with a mighty hand and an outstretched arm, with a terrifying display of power, and with signs and wonders; and he brought us into this place and gave us this land, a land flowing with milk and honey. So now I bring the first of the fruit of the ground that you, O LORD, have given me.” You shall set it down before the LORD your God and bow down before the LORD your God. Then you, together with the Levites and the aliens who reside among you, shall celebrate with all the bounty that the LORD your God has given to you and to your house.

 

 

I wonder what the Hebrews would have thought of Moses autographing the stone tablets of the law. This command in Deuteronomy was to trust and give all worship to God. It wasn’t Moses, Aaron, Miriam, or any other human leader who had liberated the Israelites from the suffocating grasp of Egypt. It was God who saved them from oppression, and it was God who they were commanded to bring their first fruits to. It wasn’t long before the Israelites put their trust into fallible people, looking to them for liberation and leadership, trusting God less and less. This led to invasion and exile. When I see how people defend our leaders who use religion as voting leverage but do not provide first fruits or exhibit fruits of the Spirit I wonder if we’re repeating the mistakes of history because we think we’re immune or because we’re not reading our Bibles.

I slack in reading my Bible too. But we’re in critical times where ignoring the lessons of the past is to our own detriment.

As we enter the season of lent we have an opportunity to take a step back and truly consider where our allegiances and priorities lie, and if they are being held together with integrity or in conflict. We cannot afford to be swayed by cheap tricks like Bible signing, wrapping arms around American flags, and being prayed over by religious leaders. Are our leaders acting with compassion, being driven by equality and justice, guarding human dignity, and uplifting the least of these? Are they giving all that they have and all that they are to the service of others? When they profess faith are they giving of their first fruits?

And then we turn to ourselves. Are we active in our faith, or just once a week pew-sitters? Do we show up on Sundays for the sake of being comforted, or so that God will speak a new word to challenge us and help us grow? Are we people of faith so that our belief will serve our own interests, or so that we might be servants to God’s world?

I will be ruminating on these questions this lenten season, remembering the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob…the God of Eve, Hagar, Deborah, and Miriam. I am transitioning from my job into a time of uncertainty. I am moving. I am leaving a painful, terrible situation. I have a lot of grief and pain weighing me down. My faith has taken a beating. As I figure out where I am going from here, I am considering this scripture and these questions. I’ll be praying about the first fruits in my life and holding my leaders accountable for theirs. I share this in hopes that you will consider these questions too.

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