Using Our Time

I think we know now, more than ever, that our time in this life is limited and tomorrow is not guaranteed. I think we also have a new appreciation for the things we have taken for granted like going to concerts and seeing movies.I know many people are itching to get out of the house and have fun. I also know that without many options of fun things to do, it is tempting to stay inside and stream movies all day. But when we have some extra time given to us, it is a gift we shouldn’t take lightly.

I have been fortunate enough to have Fridays off during the month of August. I was both excited and sad about this, excited to have time off from work but sad that during a pandemic I couldn’t do all the things I would like to do. (I know some people have traveled to beaches where they can practice social distancing while also vacationing, but I personally haven’t felt comfortable with sleeping somewhere like a motel where other people are staying because of the possibility of spreading coronavirus.)

I wasn’t sure what to do with my days off, but I knew that I didn’t want to waste them. So each Friday in August I picked a different park within 30 minutes driving distance to explore and take pictures. I am not a photographer, but it is a fun hobby to take pictures that costs little to nothing (depending on what you are wanting to invest in.) Not only was it healing and peaceful to spend some time by myself in nature, it was wonderful to be out of my house and seeing people (at a distance.) And I got some good exercise. I saw frogs, turtles, geese, great blue herons, and sasquatch! (Well, a large cut-out of sasquatch leaning on some trees.) I was also amazed to see how much natural beauty was within a short drive of my home!

If you find yourself with some time on your hands, I highly suggest taking 2 or 3 hours and exploring the outdoors near you. How well do you know the area you live in? You might be surprised at what you discover!

Whatever we find ourselves doing in this pandemic, let’s make good use of our time. It is fleeting, and even a year as terrible as this one shouldn’t be wasted. Just make sure you are responsibly taking precautions to protect yourself and others!

(These are not my personal photos, I plan on uploading and editng my own pictures soon!)

All of It

I have not reflected theologically in quite some time. Most of the theological structures that I had in place failed me magnificently over the past 2 years. I prayed a lot. I begged for revelations, affirmations, and prophesies, none of which came.

So I am reevaluting everything. All of it. Everything involving faith and spirituality. I am starting completely over at the basics and trying to unlearn my expectations and assumptions. I am not trying to force myself to fit into any systematic theology; I am letting it all fall into place slowly, organically.

So this is my second deconstruction. I went through my first during my freshman and sophomore years of college when I left my fundamentalist upbringing.

That was a decade ago! And I thought I was lucky because I got my great deconstruction done early in my life. But no. A surprise round 2 is upon me.

Something I was able to really feel and celebrate soon after my first deconstruction was how holy everything around me was. I was experiencing so many things in my college years, and it all felt sacred. Late nights with friends. Laughter. The music we made in choir. The plays and musicals we performed in theatre. The theological study I was engaging. Traveling to another country. Chapel services. Conversations in the dining hall. The songs of the crickets and the frogs at night. The way we all took care of each other in our dorm rooms when tornados were touching down nearby. It felt like the Divine was everywhere! The whole earth was full of glory. All of it.

Of course, over time this bliss has faded. I experienced hardship the year after I graduated college. Then in seminary I worked extremely hard and was focused on success. I had beautiful spiritual moments there as well, but I was pressured to follow a ministry path that didn’t fit me at all and pressured to conform to a particular theological framework to satisfy my ministry requirements. I lost a lot of essential parts of myself. I thought I had to sacrifice them to do the right thing of being faithful to seminary and ministry.

This was all bound to fail. In college I was allowed to be fully myself, for the first time ever. In ministry and in seminary I went back to being what others wanted me to be in line with a particular religious ideal.

Now I see that a second deconstruction was inevitable.

As I am reclaiming the parts of myself that were forced to be dormant, I have realized that some of the ideas I had after my first deconstruction are coming back to me.

I am wrtiting and putting my art in the world. That is holy and sacred. The great blue heron I saw a week ago while I was alone in the woods near the lake was a holy moment. The butterfly that grazes my face, the old man sitting on the park bench excitedly describing all the birds he has seen around the lake, the dog that approaches me for a pat and walks with me for a while, the choir I sing in, laughing with coworkers, these moments, this world is full of the Divine. All of it.

Navigating (A Poem)

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

NAVIGATING

Are you trying to find your way?

Me too.

Here’s what I’ve learned.

Listen for the secrets 

Whispered through the trees,

For they lead to paths of life;

But do not listen to the secrets of spiders

Because they are full of venom

And deception.

Crows squawk exaggerated tales,

But don’t dismiss them,

Because nuggets of truth are buried inside.

You might find a clue 

Under the moss-slick rocks.

Overturn a few, 

But there are no guarantees

So don’t waste too much time with them.

Finally, the frogs will sing for you

Just when you are about to give up.

Follow their tune home.

I’ll see you there.